tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2013-12-09 08:22 pm
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this is a test

this is a test...it is only a test...
tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2012-04-19 12:34 pm
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TclText - ticklish text editing by tony

Before I started using real hosting, with ssh access and vim on the server end, I managed my sites by writing them at home and uploading over ftp. Now, while this could be done with sftp or scp and vim, for the longest time, and sometimes now still, I will manage such tasks with TclText, my gro0vy, ticklish text editor, in tcl/tk, with a built-in ftp tool, and many other features.



Image/photo



Here you see me editing http://www.baldwinlinguas.com with TclText



http://tonyb.us/tcltext

#tcl #tk #editor #web
tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2012-04-11 09:13 pm

Color Chooser

Image/photo



http://tonybaldwin.me/hax/doku.php?id=colorchooser



If you make websites, like I do, and you edit them in a real editor (i.e. vim), especially on a remote server over ssh, and not some atrociously convoluted, graphical "wysiwyg" monstrosity for writing web pages that creates bloated, nasty code, well, sometimes you need a hexcode for a color for your css style sheets, and stuff. What do you do?



For this purpose, I made ColorChooser, which is just a little gui tool for grabbing color codes.

Image/photo



Now, most of the work was really already done, tk having a color chooser tool, already. All I did was write a script to make it easy to call that tool up so you could find a color, then copy/paste the hex code to wherever you need it.

Image/photo



#tcl #tk #color #webdesign



@Foss Hackers @Lazy Admin
tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2012-03-07 02:02 pm
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fren.tcl with SSL

I add an option in preferences for fren.tcl to post over a secure socket layer connection (ie, force use of SSL).



Pushed to git up, and new tarball available at http://tonyb.us/frentcl or http://tonybaldwin.me/downloads


tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2011-09-25 12:46 am

Preview of Xpostulate Improvements

A preview of what's to come...


Thinking of UI enhancements, I added the Xpostulate little icon thingy right into the GUI.






What do you think?


Other items on their way:

  • Posterous support. I have interacted with the posterous api via bash with curl, so, just need to translate my scripting for that to tcl with http. Cake, but requires time. I thought I would have that done this past week, but, no joy...too much work (somebody's gotta pay the rent around here).
  • Blogger support. - The great and benevolent Google® has granted me an API key, and I have looked at the API, but not yet played with it, but this is likely to come this season...soon, me dro0gies.

  • Read your statusnet public timeline or updates from a specific person. This I have, again, done in bash, so just a matter of coding it into tcl. Although, I question if this is appropriate for Xpostulate, and whether it might not be better to do this with iDenTickles only, since iDenTickles is a microblogging client, and Xpostulate is intended for crossposting to blogs, not reading others' updates.

  • Download, edit, & republish older entries. This is on my todo list, but for each blogging service I have to look at how their API handles this, and then code stuff in, and develop new GUI elements for housing various functions, and blah, blah, blah. It will be work..heavy lifting...but it's on my TODO list.




posted with Xpostulate
tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2010-05-21 09:42 am
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iDenTickle v1.1 released

Well...I just couldn't leave well enough alone.
Yesterday I released version 1.0 of IdenTickle, my tcl/tk denter/tweeter tool...but I just kept thinking, it could be better.
The interface could be cleaner, with the setup stuff separate.
And, perhaps an about button, as is common, to bring up a little dialog with a bit of info, and direct the user to the homepage.
Plus buttons to open your browser to your identi.ca or twitter feed...stuff like that.

So, today you have IdenTickle version 1.1.


The main interface.


and, when you open the setup tab/frame to enter your setup information.
As you'll recall, v 1.0 was already saving your login data (previous version required entry of said data, every time...annoying).

enjoy
./tony
tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2010-05-20 11:03 pm
Entry tags:

iden.tcl v. 1.0 released

Moments ago, I released a new version of IdenTickle, the tcl/tk identi.ca and twitter status update tool..



Now it saves your login information, so you don't have to enter it every time.
Additionally, I built installers for Windows and Linux.
(Mac and BSD folks, etc., will still have to install from source...sorry).
tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2010-03-27 02:50 pm

dent, tweet, xpost - all in one


Tweeting and Denting are now incorporated within the eXpostulate interface, so you can really annoy all your online friends, by x-xposting to 4 distinct blogging services, & denting and tweeting to announce your new articles!

At this moment, the denting/tweeting is still using curl, however, which is only native to * nix systems (should work on lin/bsd/mac without further configuration, but win users will have to install curl, which can be done, of course).

I will be attempting to work out tweeting/denting with tcl's own http post method. I've tried a few times, but unsuccessfully, so far. Need to log on to #tcl at freenode and get some help, or something.



posted with eXpostulate

tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2010-03-22 07:02 am

iDenTweetyPie

iDenTweetyPie

I hacked up a little more python/tkinter silliness.

iDenTweetyPie sends a dent/tweet(update) to twitter or identi.ca.

That's all, really.

I have no plans to make a full-blown client for either site, just a quick-n-dirty updating tool. I would like, however, to figure out the pubsubhub thingy to send buzzes to google/buzz.

That would take some additionaly work, since, at the moment, iDenTweetyPie tells you that you talk too much and refuses to proceed if your update is longer than 160 characters, which, of course, isn't necessary for buzz, since buzz tolerates longer updates.

I might work on that. I don't know. This was just a little exercise, really.

I had already written a similar little program in tcl/tk, iDenTickle, which initially only did dents, but I have updated that one to send tweets, too.

my dents : my tweets

./tony



Originally published at tony baldwin | bloguiando.
tonybaldwin: tony baldwin (Default)
2010-03-03 08:10 am

TransProCalc, Google Code, & Subversion.

A few days ago, as mentioned, I initiated the process of moving TransProCalc onto google code, feeling that it was time to dust off the project and move forward with it. I had merely signed the project up at that time, so, last night, before my brain turned to complete jello after spending the day slogging through the translation of some pretty heavy Brazilian academic articles, I took some time to configure the google code pages for the project, make a couple of wiki pages, upload the current, stable release, and, upload the existing code for the project.



Now, google code offers two version control systems, Subversion and Mercurial. I've never used either one before, but, at least I've heard of Subversion, so I chose to go with that one. It is, apparently, the default system, Mercurial offered as an option. I have used CVS before.

So, I aptitude installed subversion (svn) on from the debian/lenny repos, and set about trying to import my code for the first time to the project.
The instructions on the google Subversion FAQ for importing your code are rather succint.
Just use the 'svn import' command.
.
Very thorough...
So, the first thing I did was, logically, try to read the man page. Now, people frequently complain that man pages are written for the hopelessly, inhumanly geeky, and not very useful for the rest of us (ok, I do write code, but I am far from being a real hacker, yet), that they are written in some secret language, and that they are generally useless. Of course, those in the know say to read them, and find them rather useful. I confess, I have actually come to the point where I can make sense of some man pages. I'm not even ashamed to admit it. Some of them are insanely usefl (ncftp, for instance, has a very thorough man page). So, I called up "man svn".
This is what I got:

NAME
svn - Subversion command line client tool

SYNOPSIS
svn command [options] [args]


[sarcasm]That certainly cleared everything up for me...[/sarcasm]
How about explaining the options? What args? Hello!
I tried "svn help", and that gave me a list of commands, as least, but with no explanation of how to implement them, or what they did, what options or arguments could be passed to them... Folks, the Subversion project needs documentation writers. No doubt. So, I did the next natural then, and did some googling.
In defense of subversion, I must say, they have an entire book/manual for Subversion, available to be purchased in print, or read online for free.
Of course, the instructions I found in said book was that in order to import my code to my google code project, I was a bunch of garbbledy-gook, and said nothing of importing to a remote repository, only creating a repository on a local machine. I needed to import my code to a remote repository.
I did some ranting on some forums, to no avail of course (ah, but the sweet release of venting...), and did some experimenting.
I ended up resetting the repository a total of about 4 times, before I finally managed to figure out how to a) set up the svn repo at my end, b) import the code to google, and c) check in and check out.
So the code is up there, now.
Now, there do seem to be instructions available for checking out and checking in. That's not too bad. But considering the complete lack of instruction on how to actually import the code of the first time, I thought I'd share the culmination of my efforts.

:~$ cd /path/to/project/files
:~$ svn import https://projectname.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/ --username yourname

There! Your code is imported to the svn repo... I know looks simple, but there was nowhere that I could find an explanation thereof.
(okay, it might as well be martian to some of you, dear readers, but those who right code and participate in open source software projects will understand).
Happy? I am.

So, TransProCalc is now up on google code and ready to start a new life. I actually made a few minor changes to the code already, last night, before loading it up there, but not enough that I would call it a release or new version...just a little clean up, rewrote the install script, and, more than anything, a lot more commenting, since I'm hoping to have collaborators. Commenting your code makes it easier for others to find stuff and figure out what you're doing.

And, happily, I have a collaborator already! Anindita Basu, who had previously written a manual for TransProCalc, has rejoined the project (it's been out of development for nearly 2 years, recall).

ADDITIONALLY, TRANSPROCALC NEEDS TCL/TK DEVS! Want to sink your teeth into an open source translation project management project? Check out TransProCalc.

I have big plans for TransProCalc, many new features to be implemented, including but not limited to incorporation of a providers and client db, more user configurability of project parameters, and a calendar/reminder system to annoy you when invoices are due (either to you, or to your providers).
No time to work on any of that today, though...back to these articles...


originall posted to tony baldwin | bloguiando